Faculty Development

Clinical Coordinators Connect for Success

By April Stouder, MHS, PA-CAugust 17, 2016

Image: Shutterstock

With the annual Education Forum comes our fall Pando™ workshops — will we see you there?

As summer begins to wind down and we turn our attention to a new semester, fall beckons us with the promise of cooler temperatures and, of course, the annual Education Forum. This is the perfect time to catch up with colleagues, engage in scholarship and leadership opportunities, and seek out some professional development to recharge our batteries. For many, the Forum serves as an opportunity to “find your tribe” and network with those in similar faculty roles across the country and beyond. One of the most intensive places to do this is at one of the Pando™ workshops — which are being offered this year immediately following the Forum.

I’ve had the privilege of participating in a number of these exciting sessions, even serving as a facilitator for the Clinical Coordinator 101 and 201 Pandos for the past few years. I’m always struck by the openness of attendees, the willingness to share ideas or lessons learned, and the relationships that last well beyond the workshop. It is my perception that clinical educators — perhaps because of our unique faculty role or the seemingly unending challenges that come with it — are especially eager for the chance to come together to strategize, empathize, and be validated!

If you are a clinical educator with two or more years of experience in your role, you are likely at a place where the basic nuts and bolts of your position seem well-established. It took a while to wrap your brain around what this role entails, but now that you’re there, you’re probably ready to seek out additional scholarship, service, or mentorship opportunities. And that’s where the Clinical Coordinator 201 Pando workshop comes in!

This workshop can help you:

  • Brainstorm ways to add some finesse to routine clinical site and student evaluation processes.
  • Prepare for an ARC-PA site visit by ensuring you have your T’s crossed and I’s dotted in terms of the Standards.
  • Network with other experienced clinical educators who “get it.”
  • Find a space where you can “be real” about the joys and challenges of this role.

If you found yourself nodding your head “YES!” as you read these points, I invite you to consider joining us for the Clinical Coordinator 201 workshop in Minneapolis on October 16–17. This particular Pando is only offered in the fall, so if you missed out last year or have been considering signing up, don’t miss your chance to attend!

This two-day event is packed with ample time for networking, brainstorming, and idea sharing. New this year, the workshop will offer you a chance to engage in some informal mentoring of new clinical educators. What better way to expand your network of colleagues, find future collaborators for scholarship, or simply provide some encouragement? You’ve got valuable ideas to share, and we’re anxious to learn from you!

It can be helpful to develop a support system of fellow educators who understand the challenges unique to a state or geographic area, are willing to share their research interests, or are simply people with whom you “click.” Either way, the clinical coordinator retreat and clinically oriented education sessions at the Forum are a great way to kick-start this networking. And the Clinical Coordinator Pandos offer opportunities for deeper conversations and making long-term connections. I hope to see you in the fall at Clinical Coordinator 201 and am looking forward to being one of those new connections.

Stouder
April Stouder, MHS, PA-C

April is the director of clinical education at the Duke Physician Assistant Program in Durham, North Carolina. She is a member of the PAEA Conference Council and serves as a facilitator for the Clinical Coordinator Pando workshops.