PAEA Education Sessions at the 2016 AAPA Conference

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Physician Assistant Liability: National Practitioner Data Bank Analysis

Presented by: Douglas Brock, PhD, University of Washington
9:00 a.m. — 10:00 a.m.

PA clinicians and PAs in training have few resources that describe the legal or institutional actions they can expect following allegations of medical error, professionalism, mistreatment and other problems that might occur in practice. During this presentation the speakers will describe the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) —a federal registry of all reports of malpractice payments and adverse actions (e.g., license suspension) — to explore actions taken against PAs, physicians and NPs. The speakers will describe actions reported across provider type and across time, and conclude with a discussion of the value of the NPDB to better understand the incidence and nature of PA liability.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define medical error, liability, malpractice and adverse actions
  2. Describe the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) for tracking trends in medical liability
  3. Describe trends in PA, physician and NP malpractice payments
  4. Describe differences in adverse actions taken against PAs, physicians and NPs
  5. Explore medical liability as a proxy estimate for medical error and safety associated with PA practice

Growth of the PA Programs: Implications for the Profession

Presented by: Anthony Miller, MEd, PA-C, PAEA
10:00 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.

This session will evaluate the growth in the number of new PA programs and the resulting growth in the number of graduates being produced each year.  A discussion of the challenges to PA programs that impact students will be included. Predictions about the future job market for PAs will be evaluated in light of this growth.  Potential strategies for sustaining a strong job market will be discussed.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the recent growth in the number of PA graduates produced annually
  2. Predict future growth based on ARC-PA data regarding new programs
  3. Review challenges to PA education associated with rapid growth
  4. Assess the future job market for PAs and the assumptions that go with those predictions

Making the Transition from Clinician to Academia

Presented by: Kirsten Bonnin, PA-C, Midwestern University – Glendale; Sarah Bolander, MMS, PA-C, Midwestern University – Glendale
11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

Many new PA educators lack formal training and find a substantial challenge acclimating to academia. Those considering a new role in education along with new PA faculty share common concerns about this process. In light of the anticipated growth of new PA programs, this session aims to provide insight into the current issues and offer guidance about the transition from clinical practice.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand perspectives of new faculty members from various programs with regard to faculty development
  2. Recognize sources of stress and common concerns among new faculty members and potential strategies/solutions
  3. Identify areas for further exploration regarding faculty recruitment and development in early PA education
  4. Identify opportunities for different levels of involvement in PA education

Avoiding the Career Plateauing Trap

Presented by: Patrick Auth, PhD, PA-C, Drexel University
2:00 p.m. — 3:00 p.m.

Career development theory and models have tended to view career plateauing, characterized by limited hierarchical promotion opportunities, perceived or actual professional stagnation, and a period when an individual’s learning does not improve, as an inevitable process for individuals approaching retirement. However, with the combination of economic pressures on both physician assistant programs and faculty, flattening career structures in which faculty peak earlier, and longer working lives, career plateauing is increasing in frequency.  Now more than ever, new, junior, and senior faculty need to understand career plateauing in physician assistant education. Through experiential learning, participants will define career plateauing, discuss a model for career development, analyze the major types of career plateauing and discuss developing strategies for career plateauing.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss a model for career development
  2. Define career plateauing
  3. Analyze the major types of career plateauing
  4. Discuss strategies for dealing with career plateauing

Motivational Interviewing

Presented by: Don St. John, MA, PA-C, University of Iowa
3:00 p.m. — 4:00 p.m.

During this presentation the speaker will describe how to identify when motivational interviewing may be useful in clinical practice, and present practical and effective applications. General clinical examples will be used. The speaker will also discuss how to implement teaching of motivational interviewing to PA (and other health care provider) students.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the primary tenets of Motivational Interviewing
  2. Apply specific approaches to levels of patient motivation
  3. Discuss application of motivational interviewing in medical practice
  4. Consider use of motivational interviewing by PA students

Monday, May 16, 2016

Diagnostic Dilemmas: Introducing the Likelihood Ratio

Presented by: Brenda Quincy, PhD, MPH, PA-C, Butler University
9:00 a.m. — 10:00 a.m.

This session will begin with a review of common characteristics of diagnostic tests including sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and likelihood ratios. Presenters will then lead attendees through a variety of clinical vignettes in which the test characteristics are important to diagnostic decision making or to therapeutic discussions will patients. The session will end with a brief discussion of resources that will aid busy clinicians in the application of this information to patient care.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios
  2. Calculate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios
  3. Differentiate the clinical utility of each of these test characteristics
  4. Apply likelihood ratios to clinical vignettes to determine a course of action
  5. Provide a list of resources for assessing characteristics of common diagnostic tests

Preceptor Development Workshop – For the Beginning Preceptor

Presented by: Olivia Ziegler, PAEA; Nicholas Hudak, MPA, MSEd, PA-C, Duke University
10:00 a.m. — 11:00 a.m.

This workshop is for the clinically active physician assistant interested in becoming a preceptor for the first time. We will have an interactive conversation that covers what to expect regarding the basic logistics of a student rotation and basic clinical teaching strategies. A panel of students, faculty, and experienced preceptors will share their personal experiences and engage the audience in helpful role-play.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how a student rotation is set up:
    • Who are the important players and decision makers at the PA program and in their own clinic?
    • What support they can expect from the PA program?
    • What is an affiliation agreement and how are students credentialed?
  2. Understand how to effectively orient a student, including setting up expectations and learning goals
  3. Describe basic time management techniques for integrating a student into your clinical schedule
  4. Demonstrate how to provide a student real time feedback, and understand the importance of the written evaluation

Preceptor Development Workshop – For the Intermediate or Advanced Preceptor

Presented by: Olivia Ziegler, PAEA; Nicholas Hudak, MPA, MSEd, PA-C, Duke University
11:00 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.

This workshop is for the clinically active physician assistant who has experience working with students. We will have an interactive conversation that covers advanced clinical teaching strategies. A panel of students, faculty, and experienced preceptors will share their personal experiences and engage the audience in helpful role-play.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Characterize the importance of establishing student specific goals, as well as how to make real time modifications and deal with struggling students
  2. Describe how to optimize time with a student
  3. Demonstrate advanced skills for providing real time feedback
  4. Understand the various roles preceptors may fill when working with students
  5. Explore innovative clinical teaching strategies